CR-LogoSizes-2019-HorizontalWhite.png

© Campaign Research Inc. All Rights Reserved.   Privacy Policy

  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram

A Strong Majority Support NAFTA and Disapprove of President Trump

November 2, 2017

In the seventh wave of the Campaign Research Poll, a national online public opinion omnibus survey conducted among a sample of 1770 Canadian voters, 7 in 10 participants supported the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA - 71%), while one tenth opposed it (9%). As many as one fifth had no opinion (20%). Those who disapproved of NAFTA were largely Gen X (45 to 54 - 12%), Males (11%), Albertans (12%), Green Party voters (16%), the least wealthy (14%), those who approved of Donald Trump as President of the US (18%), those who didn’t watch TV (12%) and those who watched Al Jazeera (16% - caution: small base size).

 

Strong Majority Disapproves Of Donald Trump

 

Three quarters of Canadian voters disapproved of the job Donald Trump is doing as President (76%), while one sixth approved of his Presidency (14%) and one tenth didn’t have an opinion (10%). Approval of Donald Trump is largely found among younger (25 to 34 - 17%) and older Canadians (55 to 64 - 17%), males (18%), Albertans (20%), Conservatives (31%) and the least wealthy (21%). Approval of Donald Trump is, unsurprisingly, highest among those who watched Fox News (28%), those who didn’t watch cable news, and those who didn’t watch TV (20% each). Disapproval of Trump is highest among those who watch MSNBC (85%), Ici Radio-Canada (82%) and, to a lesser extent, participants who watched CBCNN, Al Jazeera, BBC World and those who didn’t have cable (80% each).

 

CTV News Channel, CBCNN, CNN Most Watched Cable News

 

More than a third of participants watched CTV News Channel (38%), CBC News Network or CNN (36% each). In a second rank of cable news outlets watched are CP24 (only in the GTA - 16%), BBC World (16%), Fox News (14%) and Ici Radio-Canada (French language only - 13%). Less watched cable news such as MSNBC (7%) and Al Jazeera (3%). About one tenth didn’t watch cable news (9%), didn’t have cable (7%) or didn’t watch TV at all (6%).

 

CBCNN (52%) and CNN (51%) are dominant in Atlantic Canada, while Ici Radio-Canada (49%) leads in Quebec and is followed by CNN (27%). In Ontario, CTV News Channel (44%), CNN (41%), CBCNN (40%) and CP24 (40%) are all equally likely to be watched. CTV News Channel leads in the Prairies (52%), followed by CBCNN (46%) and CNN (36%). In Alberta, CTV News Channel leads (44%), followed by CBCNN and CNN (37% each). In BC, CTV leads (41%), followed by CBCNN (38%) and CNN (29%). Liberals are most likely to watch CBCNN (47%) and Conservatives are most likely to watch CTV News Channel (43%). New Democrats are equally likely to watch CBC (37%), CTV (37%) and CNN (39%).

 

Fox News is most popular in the Prairies (21%), among younger Canadians (18 to 24 - 22%), the wealthy ($80K to $100K - 21%) and Trump supporters (27%)

 

“There is a strong relationship between those who approve of NAFTA and those who disapprove of Donald Trump’s Presidency. Canadians likely believe NAFTA has worked well for them and they are unhappy that President Trump has decided to renegotiate the Treaty. Prime Minister Trudeau should take note of this and understand the strong levels of support NAFTA has among Canadians” said Eli Yufest, CEO of Campaign Research. Eli may be reached at eyufest@campaignresearch.ca or at (647) 931 4025, ext. 109

 

Methodology

This online poll was conducted between September 8 and 11, 2017 among a panel of 1770 Canadian voters. A probability sample of this size would have a margin of error of plus or minus 2.3%, 19 out of 20 times. Data was weighted by age, gender and region to reflect the demographics of Canada according to 2016 Statistics Canada census data.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Featured Posts

Jagmeet Singh Soars! Can the Leader of the NDP close the deal? Maybe, just maybe!

October 10, 2019

1/7
Please reload

Recent Posts

November 14, 2019

Please reload

Archive
Please reload