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One half don't expect children to be able to buy a home. One fifth see housing price correction coming. Most think governments should build affordable housing

May 17, 2017

In the fourth wave of the Campaign Research Poll, an online omnibus opinion survey conducted among 1,970 adult Canadians, one half (50%) of those with children who do not already own homes (n=1037) say their children will not be able to afford a home in their community, and just 3 in 10 (29%) say their children will be able to afford home buying. Incidence of finding the community unaffordable is highest among boomers (55 to 64 - 61%), in BC (67%), Toronto (62%) and the surrounding GTA (63%), among federal New Democrats (58%) and those in mid income brackets ($60K to $80K - 57%). Community affordability is seen to be highest among the youngest (39%), males (34%) rather than females (25%), in Atlantic Canada (38%) and Quebec (37%) and among Conservatives (33%) and the wealthy ($80K to $100K - 38%). Those who rent are less likely to see their children affording a home (23%) than are those who own a home now (31%).

6 in 10 see affordable housing as a serious issue in their community

Six in ten (60%) Canadians think the lack of affordable housing is a serious problem in their

communities and as many as a quarter say it is a “very serious issue” (26%). This issue is seen to

be especially serious by younger groups (25 to 34 - 34%), females (27%) rather than males

(24%), in BC especially (49%), as well as Toronto (43%), among Green Party supporters (43%)

and among the least wealthy (less than $20K - 31%). Renters are more likely to see affordable

housing as a “very serious” issue (35%) than are those who own homes (21%).

 

Majority agree government should be building and owning affordable housing

 

Two thirds of Canadians agree governments should be in the business of building and owning

affordable housing (64%), while just one fifth disagree (19%). A similar proportion don’t have an

opinion (17%). Enthusiasm for state housing is especially high among the youngest (73%),

among females (68%) rather than males (61%), in Quebec (70%) and BC (69%), and, to a lesser

extent, in Toronto (67%), among New Democrats (74%) and among the least wealthy (less than

$20K - 72%, $20K to $40K - 73%). Renters are more likely to agree the government should be in

the housing business (74%) than are homeowners (58%).

 

One fifth see a housing price correction coming

One fifth of Canadians see a market correction for housing in the future (21%), whereas just

less than half don’t fear this (46%). As many as a third don’t know (33%). Believing a correction

is due is common to mid age groups (35 to 44 - 26%), males (22%) more than females (19%), in

Alberta (23%), Toronto (23%) and the surrounding GTA (25%), as well as among the wealthiest

(26%).

 

More than a fifth see market correction within a year

 

More than one fifth of Canadians see a housing market correction occurring within a year or

less (22%), and this group is comprised of few who see it occurring within a month (2%), three

months (2%), six months (6%) and those who see it happening in a year or so (12%). About one

fifth see the market undergoing a correction in more than a year (17%), while about one

quarter think no correction is imminent (22%). As many as 4 in 10 don’t know if or when this

will occur (39%).

 

“The affordable housing situation is dire indeed when one half of parents with children who

don’t own homes think those kids will never own a home in their community. It is interesting

to see the high level of support for government built and owned affordable housing, a

situation which has proved problematic in Toronto.” ​said Eli Yufest, CEO of Campaign

Research. Eli may be reached at eyufest@campaignresearch.ca or at (647) 931-4025 ext 109.

 

METHODOLOGY

 

This online poll was conducted between May 9 and 13, 2017, among a sample of 1,969 adult

Canadians. A probability sample of this size would have a margin of error of plus or minus 2%,

19 times out of 20.

 

 

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